The Hot Springs of Pamukkale

The English Travelers at the Hot Springs in Turkey After a long (but decent) eleven-hour overnight bus ride, we arrived in Denizli and easily found a mini bus to take us the remaining 20 kilometers to Pamukkale. Our hotel was really nice. The breakfast was fantastic and just a stones-throw away from the hot springs. Hotel in PamukkaleTurkish BreakfastTurkish BreakfastAfter breakfast, we rested for a bit before heading out to explore the hot springs.PamukkalePamukkale means cotton castle in Turkish, and it’s easy to see where the name comes from while approaching the ever famous hot springs.PamukkaleIn order to help protect the site, no shoes were allowed awhile walking through the springs. Yes, after trekking to the Mt. Everest Base Camp in Nepal, we sent our hiking boots home which left us with one pair of shoes for the remainder of our trip–our chacos! Which, for those of you who don’t know, leave a “Z” tan line on your feet. Pamukkale Hot SpringsThe hot springs are just amazing. Pamukkale has been on our bucket list for so long… It was very neat to walk through the hot springs and experience this natural wonder for ourselves. Pamukkale Hot SpringsBefore visiting the hot springs, I always wondered, can you swim in this natural wonder? The answer is yes, and no. Tourists are no longer allowed to swim in the natural hot springs. This change was made to preserve this beautiful place. However, off to the side of the real hot springs are man-made terraces where the natural water flows through. These are the springs that tourists are still allowed to enjoy.Hot Springs in Turkey Hot Springs in Turkey Pamukkale Hot Springs in TurkeyHot Springs in TurkeyThe English Travelers at the Hot Springs in TurkeyHot Springs in Turkey The view of the town from on top of the hill was gorgeous.View of Pamukkale After wandering around the hot springs, we decided to check out the ruins located on top of the hill — the ancient city of Hierapolis. Hierapolis A storm started to roll in while we were exploring the ruins, and while it scared most people away, we waited it out and just about had the place to ourself! HierapolisHierapolisHierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis  Hierapolis  Jared and I didn’t expect much from the “ancient ruins above the hot springs,” but we were surprised at how vast the ruins were and we enjoyed our time there just as much as exploring the hot springs. Hierapolis  Hierapolis is also the city where St. Phillip was martyred and buried… below is a picture of his tomb. Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis This is believed to be the site of St. Phillip’s death. The ruins on the site are what remains of a church that was built after his death. Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of HierapolisThe ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis The ancient city of Hierapolis

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